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1 edition of The conchologist"s book of species, containing descriptions of six hundred species of univalves found in the catalog.

The conchologist"s book of species, containing descriptions of six hundred species of univalves

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Published by H. Washbourne in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mollusca,
  • Snails,
  • Gastropoda,
  • Mollusks

  • Edition Notes

    Includes index.

    Statementby Sylvanus Hanley
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 154 pages, 2 unnumbered pages :
    Number of Pages154
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26366747M


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The conchologist"s book of species, containing descriptions of six hundred species of univalves by Sylvanus Hanley Download PDF EPUB FB2

Excerpt from The Conchologist's Book of Species: Containing Descriptions of Six Hundred Species of Univalves, With Numerous Illustrations It need only be further stated, that for the selection of the best descriptions, continual comparisons have been made of the different writers on the subject; and scarcely in a single instance have the characteristics of a shell been given without the shell Author: Sylvanus Hanley.

Get this from a library. The conchologist's book of species: containing descriptions of six hundred species of univalves. [Sylvanus Hanley]. The young conchologist's book of species: Univalves.

Containing descriptions of six hundred species, and illustrated by many figures [Hanley, Sylvanus] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The young conchologist's book of species: Univalves.

Containing descriptions of six hundred species, and illustrated by many figures. The conchologist's book of species: containing descriptions of six hundred species of univalves: with numerous illustrations by Hanley, Sylvanus, Pages:   The conchologist's book of species: containing descriptions of six hundred species of univalves Item Preview containing descriptions of six hundred species of univalves by Hanley, Sylvanus Charles Thorp, Publication date Topics This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Pages: OCLC Number: Description: pages illustrations, color frontispiece 21 cm: Responsibility: Containing descriptions of six hundred species, and illustrations by many figures. Index to Catalogue of recent bivalve shells; The young conchologist's book of ves J.

Fraser (London); The conchologist's book of species: containing descriptions of six hundred species of An illustrated, enlarged, and English edition of Lamarck's Species of shells comprising the whole of the recent additions in Deshayes' last French edition, with.

The conchologist's book of species: containing descriptions of six hundred species of univalves. Mollusks; Gastropoda. ^ i ^. P,i1t.*->,n/ JjST^-e^r Ttpo-f.-nt S*^ '.r-M^rtii. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these.

Full text of "A monograph of the Crag Mollusca: with descriptions of shells from the upper Tertiaries of the British Isles" See other formats. A species described as being perforated at the apex, by a stellated perforation.

No species of Belemnite at present known agreeing with the description; it is supposed to have been taken from a broken specimen. ACANTHOCHETES. A name given to a species of Chiton having bunches of bristles at the sides of the valves.

ACARDO. Commerçon. William Wood (–), trained as a physician, soon turned his attention to natural history book publication and sales. Working in London, his chief malacological publications were the General conchology (–; reprinted in ), two editions of the Index testaceologicus (, –; the latter reprinted in ), and a Supplement () to the Index containing many new Cited by: The Student's Elements of Geology by Sir Charles Lyell Part 4 out of length, and as in the case of Lago Maggiore from a thousand to two thousand six hundred feet below the previous level of the river-channel, and also that the hundred of species extinct or not known as living.

The present species, however, is six times larger than the more common sort, some of which was mixed up with it, their diameters as ascertained by Mr. Huxley, being respectively 8. A species described as being perforated at the apex, by a stellated perforation.

No species of Belemnite at present known agreeing with the description; it is supposed to have been taken from a broken specimen. ACANTHOCHETES. A name given to a species of Chiton having bunches of bristles at the sides of the valves. ACARDO. Commerçon. This property of the Pholas is referred to in Captain Brown’s Conchologist’s Text Book, p.

Brown’s book contains a number of such odd facts that are not in The Conchologist’s First Book. Works, VIII, Ibid., VIII, [The following footnotes appear at the bottom of page ] The second (and all other names a species may accumulate - up to a hundred or more, for very variable beasties!) then becomes a "synonym" of the first name, which is the only one that is valid.

This can cause confusion at times, especially when a name has been used for a long time before an older name is dug up, and everyone has to change his. The species thus selected are E. splendidula, E. marmorata, E. interrupta, E. imbricata, E. brunnea; the two last of which have the.

umbilicus so inconsiderable, as to be scarcely distinguishable from. other species, which M. Deshayes has left in the genus Eulima, and. which have a slight hollow, almost approaching to a perforation, behind. the. Casual mentions of "freshwater shells" are out, but uses of Latinized names ("unios") are in.

Otherwise extra-limital papers that are cited are those containing (1) first description or first illustration of a valid west American species, (2) catalogues of type specimens of west.

Have the suckers alternating in two rows along each foot. The common species, Sepia octopodia, Lin., with a slightly rough skin, arms six times the length of its body, and furnished with one hundred and twenty pairs of cups, infests the coast of Europe in summer, and.

The common species, Sepia octopodia, Lin., with a slightly rough skin, arms six times the length of its body, and furnished with one hundred and twenty pairs of cups, infests the coast of Europe in summer, and destroys immense numbers of fishes and crustacea.

Full text of "Elements of conchology: An Introduction to the Natural History of Shells and of the Animals " See other formats. The present species, however, is six times larger than the more common sort, some of which was mixed up with it, their diameters as ascertained by Mr.

Huxley, being respectively 8 1/2 over and 1 1/8 over of an inch. Page This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation.

Catalog of species-group names of Recent and fossil Scaphopoda (Mollusca) Gerhard STEINER Institute of Zoology, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, A Vienna (Austria) [email protected] Alan R. KABAT Formerly Dpt of Invertebrate Zoology (Mollusks), National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

(USA) Present address: Calvert Street, Washington, D. Ceylon; an Account of the Island Physical, Historical, and eBook Serpents.—­Venomous species rare Cobra de capello Instance of land snakes found at sea Tame snakes (note) Star rubies, the “asteria” of Pliny (so called from their containing a movable six-rayed star), are to be had at Ratnapoora and for very trifling sums.

The blue. Full text of "Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society" See other formats. With good sleighing, six or seven of these dogs will draw from eight to ten hundred weight, at the rate of seven or eight miles an hour, for several hours together.

The GREYHOUND, (one of the second division,) is the all the dogs, and is used principally in the chase of the hare. a hundred specimens, and no doubt the tank made a glorious show; but Mr.

Gosse, though the Napoleon of his specialty, was forced to acknowledge that there was an " impossible.". indigo containing bromide. Probably most, if not all, species of Murex, Thais, P^irpiira and other members of the Muricid family produce this bromide, dye-giving secretion.

It has been suggested by some workers that this secretion serves as an anesthetic. on various. oysters, clams. and chitons upon \\'hich. they prey. How-ever, the presence of. hundred photographs available for the purpose, the choice has been narro\\ed down to 25 new half-tones and 14 old ones.

This leaves without t illustration such interesting physiographic features as the supposed highest hill in the state (in Polk County), the limestone caves of Marion County, the noted natural race-course of Daytona.

Instead of the fleshy belly on which the Univalves glide along, the Bivalves are furnished with a peculiar organ, which in some species serves the purpose of motion. The Oyster, however, and some other species, have no power of changing their position, but are, as it were, cemented to the rock on which the spawn first chanced to fall.

Ruskin the reluctant conchologist Ruskin the reluctant conchologist S. Peter Dance Journal of the History of Collections vol. 16 no. 1 () pp. 35±46 John Ruskin saw the natural world as though it was a moral being obeying moral laws. In three books about plants, birds and geology he tended to worship natural phenomena and natural objects rather than to analyse them.

Thecodont family of reptiles is common to the Trias and Permian groups in Germany, and the geologists employed in the government survey of Great Britain have come to the conclusion, that the rock containing the two species alluded to at p.and of which the teeth are represented in figs.ought rather to be referred.

Perhaps Hanley's most important book at the time was A history of British Mollusca, and their shells (Forbes & Hanley, –), published in four volumes, and co-authored with the distinguished marine biologist Edward Forbes (–).

This work is noteworthy for its extensive anatomical descriptions and ecological observations of the included species, which may lead some to conclude Cited by: 9. containing several hundred species and bearing data labels is best housed in cabinets with sliding drawers.

Many collectors place choice specimens in plastic boxes with a felt or cloth bottom. Plastic foam padding should be avoided because it will eventually break down and stick to the specimens.5/5(1).

Perry’s Arcana: a facsimile edition with a collation and systematic review. The Academy of Natural Sciences and Temple University Press, Philadelphia.

This book is printed on acid-free paper for greater strength and longevity. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Perry, George, b. The first nineteen chapters of the book are purely an empirical statement of the evidence then available as to the existence of man in pre-historic times: the rest of the book is devoted to a consideration of the connection between the facts previously stated and Darwin's theory of the origin of species by variation and natural selection.

Among the many species, the shell may take various shapes, yet, for any one species, the shell shape is usually quite constant (excepting, of course, minor clinal, populational and ecopheno- typic variations exhibited by some species).

The shells among the different species may vary from very elongate, to globose, depressed and discoidal. Many fossil species have been referred to this genus, but they have been found chiefly in marine formations, and are suspected by some conchologists to belong to N2atica and other mlarine genera.

All univalve shells of land and freshwater species, ~-L~ W with the exception psis (fig. 4i), and Acha — Ampldlariagclauca, tina, which has. Manual of Elementary Geology, by Charles Lyell 5. Early in the yearMr.

Logan laid before the Geological Society of London a slab of this sandstone from. Beauharnais, containing no less than twenty-eight foot-prints of the fore and hind feet of a quadruped, and six. casts in plaster of Paris, exhibiting a continuation of the same trail.

Each cast contained from twenty-six to. The common species. Sepia octopodia, Lin., with a slightly rough skin, anus six times the length of its body, and fur- nished with one hundred and twenty pairs of cups, infests the coast of Europe in summer, and destroys immense numbers of fishes and Crustacea.Full text of "U.S.

Geological Survey professional paper" See other formats.the-nautilus - The nautilus.